How to Make Puberty Easier for Your Daughter

How to Make Puberty Easier for Your Daughter

Puberty can be a testing time – full of emotion and fear, but it doesn’t have to be. Our helpful tips will ensure you and your daughter know what to expect...


Your daughter will need you more than ever, both emotionally and physically, during this important stage of her development. Following a few simple rules will help keep you both sane – and bring you closer – during this tricky time.

 

Think ahead

If possible, don’t wait until your daughter is experiencing puberty before you talk about it together. A smart idea is to discuss it before it actually appears – from talking through body changes she’s likely to experience to explaining mood swings and PMT. Ensuring you’ve prepared her for what’s on the horizon means she won’t be scared when her first period appears, or when her body starts to change (link to ‘Everything You Need To Prepare Your Teen – And Yourself – For The Changes That Come With Puberty! [REFNO10]).

 

Be open

The key to making sure your daughter feels supported and secure in the changes she’s experiencing is communication: filling her in on your own experiences can really help. Sharing how you felt, from positive anecdotes about your first period to funny moments you experienced as a teenager, should, in turn, encourage your daughter to be open, too. If older sisters or cousins live nearby, it’s worth asking them to bear this in mind as well – if, together, you can get her to speak openly about her feelings, you’re halfway there.

 

But give her privacy, too

Puberty can be quite a stressful time, so it’s important your daughter feels she has privacy when she needs it. Encourage siblings to respect that by knocking before entering her room and giving her space when she asks for it. Sharing a bathroom with parents and siblings may also feel overwhelming, if you can, provide her with personal storage space and deal tactfully with long seclusions behind locked doors. Make older siblings aware that it’s a sensitive time and that your daughter is likely to be dealing with PMS and mood swings, which everyone needs to understand and be sympathetic to. 

 

Registration

Become a member of Reward Me and get exclusive offers!

Become a member

Explain that everyone is different

Most girls start their periods between the ages of 10 and 16, with the majority getting their first period at the age of 12. But it’s important to reiterate how different we all are, and that even if she feels ‘early’ or ‘late’, chances are a lot of her friends are in the same boat. It’s worth reminding your daughter that it’s not all about periods, either – she’ll experience changes to her body in other ways, which might include putting on weight or getting spots thanks to those pesky hormones. Knowing everybody’s different and that many of these changes are temporary, should be comforting, so encourage her to talk openly about her experiences amongst her friends.

 

Prepare her with products

Puberty means a lot of change, so it’s worth taking a shopping trip to pick up anything your daughter might need – from new bras to painkillers, tampons and sanitary pads (check out the ratings and reviews of Always products (link to Always product pages) to help her choose which one she’ll like best). Not only will she start to notice her body changing shape, but body hair will make an appearance as well, so think about which razors or waxing kits your daughter might be most comfortable with. Make her aware of the possibility of spotting between periods – often caused by hormonal birth control, or noticed a day or two after ovulation. Make sure she has some liners handy – Always Sheer Dailies Regular Liners (link to a specific product page) are thin and flexible and will protect against spotting without making her feel bulky and uncomfortable.

 

Remind her she’s more than her body

While it’s a time of huge change for your daughter, impress upon her that she’s more than the changes her body is experiencing. Most young girls feel incredibly self-conscious about what’s happening to them, so it’s wise to reassure her that life isn’t just about your body or the way you look. Remind her regularly of her talents and skills (ask family members to help here, too) and fill her with confidence – you’ll be amazed what a little encouragement can do.

 

Do you have any tips and advice on helping your daughter deal with puberty to share? Please add your comments below and visit Always (link to Always BLP) for more information on discreet protection.

Confirm your personal information

In order to finalize your request, please fill-in the requested information below.